7/7/09

Lipofsky also recently received a Major Award. On June 11 at the Corning Auditorium, Marvin received The Lifetime Achievement Award from the Glass Art Society.

Well, Ok then.

His work was also mentioned in last week's New York Times. Check out Art in Review.

 

 

"Bette's Oceanview Diner classic buttermilk pancake recipe" is a review at examiner.com. "Ovid, the '57 Chevy, and the pancakes at Bette's Oceanview Diner, are classics because they remain perfect regardless of the passage of time or the tides of fashion."

 

 

900 GRAYSON had its best weekday ever last Friday.

 

 

 

Steve Smith emails

Hey Ron,

I know how you like to read public commentary so I'm sharing.

Whenever I'm in the car with the whole fam, and we pass beneath the Aquatic Park Pedestrian Bridge, I hear from the back seats...."Ugly statue, ugly statue, ugly statue"....usually well-paired with a familiar nursery rhyme melody. Followed with, "Hey mom, you know what would be better than an ugly statue? A gold statue that looks [like] King Kongs hand".

I personally have no comment on the public works of "art" nor do I take any responsibility for the above free-speech commentary. Hey, suum cuique pulchrum est. Right?

see you round,
Steve

p.s. I know how you [like] Latin as well.

 

 

 


Kubik emails "S.F. homicides fall as police flood tough areas" Jaxon Van Derbeken, Chronicle Staff Writer.

"San Francisco's homicide total for the first half of 2009 hit a nine-year low - falling more than 50 percent from last year - a drop that police officials attribute to flooding high-crime areas with officers and focusing on the handful of people who commit most of the crimes."

 

 

Charlie Rose interviews Pete G Peterson about our economic future, our debt, health care and more. Check it out.

 

 

"Democracy's Failing Light" by Arundhati Roy of Outlook India Magazine here at truthout.net.

"While we're still arguing about whether there's life after death, can we add another question to the cart? Is there life after democracy? What sort of life will it be? By democracy I don't mean democracy as an ideal or an aspiration. I mean the working model: Western liberal democracy, and its variants, such as they are."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/8/09

post from the past

7/7/04

There are lots of ways to get to work in Potter Creek

Red, the glassman, likes to scoot

 

 

 

There was a Berkeley PD "traffic stop" yesterday around 2:00 PM, south bound on 8th just off Dwight--several radio cars and a motor.

 

 

"Berkeley: crime-infested and dangerous to know?" is a report at sfgate.com.

"Berkeley -- the 43rd most dangerous city in the United States? Really? Go figure. But that is the case, according to recently released data by online relocation resource Neighborhood Scout. "

 

"Crime in Berkeley: Lies, damned lies and statistics" is an opinion at sfbizjournal.com.

"Berkeley is the 43rd most dangerous city in the United States and the most dangerous place to live in California.

Huh?

A report by NeighborhoodScout, a.k.a. Location Inc., a Woonsocket, R.I., home buying helper web site says so in a report.

The company, which mines data on school quality and crime rates to help homebuyers find good neighborhoods to live in, helpfully lists the 'Top 100 Most Dangerous Cities in the U.S.' with a population of 25,000 or more.

Neither San Francisco nor Oakland - the perennial local whipping boy when it comes to crime - are on the list.

Study the report on Berkeley and it shows, not surprisingly, that the area downtown along Shattuck Avenue west of the U.C. Berkeley campus is the most dangerous, with a rating of 1 out of 100, where 100 is the safest. This isn't a surprise, since robbers tend to go where the people are, where the money is (i.e. ATMs).

You won't find any ATMs along leafy, meandering Shasta Road, which switches back and forth up through the Berkeley Hills. It gets an 85 rating, by comparison.

Screenshots from NeighborhoodScout's site.

According to the report, your 'chances of becoming a victim' of violent crime in Berkeley are 1 in 177."

 

Or, maybe, just maybe, our bubble has burst and we find we're really not special, not really better, not more pure of motive, not importantly different, not unique, not the chosen, but just like everybody else, maybe sometimes a little better and in some ways worse. Just maybe. RP

 

 

"Richmond man convicted in Berekeley fatal shooting" is a report at mercurynews.com.

"A Richmond man was convicted today of first-degree murder and attempted second-degree robbery for the shooting death of 23-year-old Wayne Drummond of Oakland near the University of California at Berkeley campus three years ago.

An Alameda County Superior Court jury deliberated for only three hours before delivering its verdict against 23-year-old Nicholas Beaudreaux for the Sept. 4, 2006, incident.

Beaudreaux faces a term of 50 years to life in state prison when Judge C. Don Clay sentences him on Aug. 28. Sentencing guidelines call for him to get 25 years to life for his first-degree murder conviction and another 25 years for using a gun to cause Drummond's death."

 

 

 

I'm told the Berkeley Bowl's going to have a proper Grand Opening, and also, that there is now a Berkeley Bowl highway-sign on south-bound 80.

 

Claudia emails

Did you hear that the Bowl is having special food demonstrations from 7/10 to 7/13, and then the cafe opens formally on 7/13? I don't know any more details but good news that the cafe is going to open! Can you believe that the Bowl has only been opened for one month? Certainly has changed the way I eat, shop and thrive!

Claudia

 

 

"Berkeley Rep Receives American Express Grant For Fellowship" is a story at broadwayworld.com.

"Today Berkeley Repertory Theatre announced that 16 emerging leaders from across the nation - including six Northern California natives - have been awarded fellowships for the upcoming season. This year's fellowships will be supported by a generous $50,000 grant from American Express, complementing a similar gift received earlier from the Koret Foundation. Every year, through this esteemed training program, college graduates from across America develop their leadership skills by working alongside accomplished professionals and renowned artists at this Tony Award-winning theatre."

 

 

"Noel Coward's 'Private Lives' comes to California Shakespeare Theatre" by Pat Craig, Contra Costa Times.

"The charmingly jaundiced wit of Noel Coward is set to purr out across California Shakespeare Theatre Company's Bruns Amphitheatre, as a tasty dollop of drawing room sophistication comes to the great outdoors with 'Private Lives.' "

 

 

"YMCA teen center to be built in Berkeley" is a story by Doug Oakley, Berkeley Voice.

"The Berkeley-Albany YMCA will begin construction of a $5.2 million teen center this fall to help area youth with academics, careers and community service."

 

"Berkeley Flea Market" is part of a review at examiner.com.

"When I lived in Oakland, this was my go-to flea market. With an international flair and drum beats in the air, the Berkeley Flea Market is run & owned by a non-profit community organization and takes place every Saturday & Sunday from 7am to 7pm. It is situated right next to the Ashby Bart station at 1937 Ashby Avenue. There are many regular vendors who sell anything from old, hard to find vinyl LPs to hand-made soaps, body oils and incense."



" 'Fat Activists' Seek Law Banning Weight Discrimination" writes Mridu Khullar at thewip.net.

"In December 2008, Binghamton, New York, became one of just six cities in the United States to enact laws protecting against weight discrimination. The others are San Francisco and Santa Cruz (California), Urbana (Illinois), Madison (Wisconsin), and Washington D.C. The only state in the country to have such a law is Michigan.

Sondra Solovay, an attorney based in Berkeley, California, says fat people are often victims of discrimination and abuse in employment, social settings, places of public accommodation, and among their peers. "

 

 

"Little Manila:Filipinos in California's Heartland" is at KVIE-TV documentary worth watching.

"Filled with chop suey houses, gambling dens, and dance halls, Little Manila was the area in Stockton notoriously called, Skid Row, but it was also the closest thing Filipinos had to a hometown. In its heyday in the 30s, this lively area had the largest population of Filipinos outside of the Philippines. This program tells the story of Jimmy Ente, Jr., a longtime Stockton resident recruited to work in the asparagus fields. Jimmy, and many other like him, faced backbreaking work, low wages, and at times extreme racism to fulfill their dreams. Narrated by famed Filipino-American producer Dean Devlin, this documentary tells the immigrant story as Filipinos experienced it." Check it out.

 

 

"The Man Who Crashed the World" is a report by Michael Lewis at vanityfair.com.

"Almost a year after A.I.G.'s collapse, despite a tidal wave of outrage, there still has been no clear explanation of what toppled the insurance giant. The author decides to ask the people involved-the silent, shell-shocked traders of the A.I.G. Financial Products unit-and finds that the story may have a villain, whose reign of terror over 400 employees brought the company, the U.S. economy, and the global financial system to their knees."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/9/09

posts from the past

7/04

A gourmet reader from Mexico City offers her

Isabel's Strawberries:

1 pound of fresh strawberries
1/2-cup of sugar
2-cups of white dry wine
1/4-cup of freshly chopped basil

After washing the strawberries, put them on a large bowl and cover them
with the sugar, wine, and basil. Mix everything with your hands, being
careful.
Cover them and leave them a couple of hours--mix them
from time to time.

(I'm not very good at writing these kind of things in English, I
usually do it in Spanish.) Isabel

Isabel's Mint Chicken recipe is coming soon.

 

The Junket is a "European Style Cafe and Delicatessen" owned by Bruno and Cindy Frisch. It is more accurately a German/Austro-Hungarian delicatessen and cafe filled with meats and sausages--bockwurst, knockwurst and bratwurst, cookies and old fashioned candies--amaretto cake and marzipan, condiments--vanilla sugar, sweet paprika, cheeses, German wines and, of course, zwieback. You can eat there, too. Check them out! They are at 235 El Cerrito Plaza, at the far end of the Farmer's Market. There phone is 510-524-4622. (But, where are the German and Austrian flags. I see the flags of Sweden, Norway and Denmark but not the German tricolor or the Austrian red and white.)

 

 

7/12/05

"Berkeley is Once Again a Progressive Leader" offers our Mayor, Tom Bates in a Daily Planet commentary. Good stuff Boss. But a progressive leader? Get a grip. We're living in the past. "The times, they are a changin'."

 

 

 

 

 

"Idaho wind turbine maker gets fed loan guarantee" is an AP report.

"Nordic Windpower USA, Inc. says it's gotten conditional U.S. Department of Energy commitment for a $16 million loan guarantee that will help it expand its plant in southeastern Idaho.

The Berkeley, Calif.-based company is hoping to use the low-interest loans enabled by the federal guarantee to expand its Pocatello assembly facility."

 

 

 

"Japan's Master Animator to Be Honored in U.S. Visit" is a story at nytimes.com.

A scene from "Ponyo," a coming film by Hayao Miyazaki

"When the schedule of events for the 40th Comic-Con International fan convention is announced on Thursday, it is expected to include something quite rare, even for a gathering that has pretty much seen it all: an appearance by Hayao Miyazaki."

 

 

"The Place of Women on the Court" is an interview with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at nytimes.com.

"In late February, three weeks after she had an operation for a recurrence of cancer, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg went to Barack Obama's first address to Congress. Given the circumstances, it wasn't an event anyone expected her to attend. She went, she said, because she wanted the country to see that there was a woman on the Supreme Court."

 

 

 

As Auerbach again "blew" the stop sign on 8th and Grayson at 6:54 last night, I was reminded that there was a 7 o'clock Planning Commission meeting. (Rick you got a bad valve in that Datsun or a really bad exhaust-manifold leak.)

Ah, the west-Berkeley Plan, . . . my very first post.

10/22/02 We find in The City of Berkeley's West Berkeley Plan of which Potter Creek is part "Yet while all parts of Berkeley felt they benefited (between 1906-1941) from growth, political issues remained between West and East Berkeley. West Berkeley made a serious, though unsuccessful attempt to secede from Berkeley in 1908. One major reason for the effort was the incorporation in the 'reform' City Charter of 1909 of a complete prohibition on bars and alcohol sales in Berkeley, more than a decade before national prohibition." When I came to Cal in 1963 I found there were still no bars within a mile of Campus - I'd come from the University of Wisconsin, Madison where beer was served in the Student Union.

How ' 'bout throwing the Plan ta hell out?

It is after all, over twenty years old and was put together by amateurs. More important, we are in revolutionary times!

And it'd take less effort and time to draft a new plan than to fartz around with the old one, making sure all the special interests are taken care of. Let's have some innovation and vision and come up with a 21st Century plan, not some warmed-up, left-over.

Come on guys and girls, with some balls and bippies we can have a vital, relevant, and exciting new plan of this century.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/10/09

David Snipper emails

 

 

 

"How To Get Fit On Vacation" is a report by Rebecca Ruiz at forbes.com.

"The best way to get healthy while on holiday is to book one that requires you to get in shape ahead of time.

This summer the Berkeley, Calif., travel company Backroads will send about 100 cycling enthusiasts on a 260-mile trek through southern Oregon's wilderness. Over five days, they'll slowly climb high-desert mountains for a cumulative elevation gain of 19,000 feet."

 

 

"After long delay, construction begins on UC sports facility" by Kristin Bender, Oakland Tribune.

"It's been nearly a year since the longest urban tree-sit in recent history ended and construction on the University of California sports training center project began.

The area that was once a grove of oaks and redwoods is now filled with bulldozers, dirt piles and men in hard hats."

 

 

"Historic Atom Smasher Reduced to Rubble and Revelry" is a story at wired.com.

'What was once the world's biggest atom smasher will soon be nothing more than a collection of old photos and the dust beneath the next big science machine.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Bevatron, built by the Atomic Energy Commission for $9 million in the early '50s, is slowly being demolished in the hills overlooking San Francisco Bay. In a few years, all traces of it will be gone."

 

 

 

"Nanopillars Promise Cheap, Efficient, Flexible Solar Cells" is a press release at sciencedaily.com.

" Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have demonstrated a way to fabricate efficient solar cells from low-cost and flexible materials. The new design grows optically active semiconductors in arrays of nanoscale pillars, each a single crystal, with dimensions measured in billionths of a meter."

 

 

 

 

"Three arrested in Berkeley-Oakland gang war" reports Henry K. Lee, Chronicle Staff Writer.

Three alleged leaders of a violent Berkeley gang were arrested today during raids in which one of the men was shot and wounded by police, authorities said.

The suspects, Coleon Carroll, 19, his brother Joseph Carroll, 22, and Gregg Fite, 34, were at the center of a long-running feud between groups in Berkeley and North Oakland, police said."
full story

 

 

 

"Mysterious tremors detected on San Andreas Fault" is a report by Alicia Chang of the AP.

"Scientists have detected a spike in underground rumblings on a section of California's San Andreas Fault that produced a magnitude-7.8 earthquake in 1857.

What these mysterious vibrations say about future earthquakes is far from certain. But some think the deep tremors suggest underground stress may be building up faster than expected and may indicate an increased risk of a major temblor.

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, monitored seismic activity on the fault's central section between July 2001 and February 2009 and recorded more than 2,000 tremors. The tremors lasted mere minutes to nearly half an hour.

Unlike earthquakes, tremors occur deeper below the surface and the shaking lasts longer."

 

 

 

Check out Charlie Rose' interview with Roger Altman--rarified, informative stuff.

"Roger Altman is former United States Deputy Treasury Secretary; he served in that office during the presidency of Bill Clinton. He resigned in 1994 because of a record keeping scandal.

He was an advisor to John Kerry during Kerry's 2004 presidential campaign. He is a graduate of Georgetown University and the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business. In his professional pursuits Roger Altman is a senior investment banker. He was a general partner of Lehman Brothers from 1974 to 1977. From 1977 to 1981 he served as the Assistant Secretary of the United States Department of the Treasury, during which time he helped oversee the then-troubled financial affairs of Chrysler. In 1981, he returned to Lehman Brothers, where he became the co-head of investment banking and served on the board of the company and the management committee. In 1987, Mr. Altman joined the Blackstone Group as vice-chairman, head of merger and acquisition advisory and a member of the investment committee. In 1993 Mr Altman returned to Washington DC to serve as the Deputy Secretary of the US Treasury before co-founding Evercore Partners, an investment and advisory company in New York, in 1996. He is currently the Chairman and Co-CEO. "

 

Rose' program with Stephen Cohen is also worthy.

"Stephen F. Cohen is an American scholar of Russian studies. His academic work concentrates on developments in Russia since the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 and the country's relationship with the United States. He is a friend of former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, advised former President George H.W. Bush when the Soviet Union collapsed, and helped Nikolay Bukharin's widow rehabilitate his name during the Soviet era.

Cohen has authored several books; including, 'Rethinking the Soviet Experience: Politics and History Since 1917', 'Buhkarin and the Bolshevik Revolution: A Political Biography, 1888-1938', and most recently, 'Failed Crusade: America and the Tragedy of Post-Communist Russia'.He is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/11/09

posts from the past

7/11/03

Hot Fudge Sauce

In a medium saucepan over medium heat bring 1 cup of heavy cream and 1/2 cup light corn syrup just to a boil stirring until the syrup has liquified -- about 2 minutes. Remove from heat -- whisk in 16 ounces of chopped semi-sweet fine quality chocolate until melted and shiny.
(I used Scharffen Berger semi-sweet pure dark chocolate.)

Cooled sauce can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 month. Reheat gently over low heat or a double boiler.

Vanilla Ice Cream

2 large eggs
3/4 cup sugar
2 cups heavy cream
1 cup milk.

Whisk the eggs in a mixing bowl until light and fluffy, 1 to 2 minutes. Whisk in the sugar a little at a time, then continue to whisk until completely blended about 1 minute more. Pour in the cream and milk and whisk to blend.
Transfer the mixture to an ice cream maker and freeze following the manufacturers instructions -- makes 1 quart.

(Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream and Dessert Book Workman Publishing N.Y. [1987].)

An old friend and former manager of The Buttercup Bakery, Mary Guenther, made this with Scharffen Berger chocolate for dessert Wednesday night producing maybe best hot fudge sundays ever.

 

 

Tired of fighting traffic and not always up to riding your bicycle? Get one of these Leclerc units.

 

 

 

Snipper emails

 

quote of the week

"Be who you are and say what you feel... 
Because those that matter... don't mind...
And those that mind... don't matter."

included in Snipper's email

 

 

Dave Kruse emails about a Kruse vehicle breakin-robbery and diversion yesterday.

The Kruse Prius was broken in to on 7th Street at 4:30 pm today while an accomplice rings door at 904 Pardee Service Dept, and creates diversion by asking for job application. Phone, tools, GPS were stolen through Prius broken window.

Accomplice is male 5'10" 200 lb, long dark pony tail, missing front tooth, medium complexion, walks with slight limp. 

Dave Kruse
President
L J Kruse Co

 

 

 

"VASKA Introduces Green Chemicals to Commercial Laundry Industry" is a press release at prnewswire.com.

"VASKA, a Berkeley based producer of green, botanically based laundry care products for the commercial, institutional and consumer markets, is pleased to announce that it has successfully turned the first major commercial laundry plant in the United States (and possibly the world) green! Royal Laundry of South San Francisco is the largest privately owned commercial laundry on the West Coast, washing one million pounds of laundry a week for more than a hundred Northern California hotels using VASKA's green laundry solutions in its three state-of-the-art tunnel systems.

Royal Laundry has been a major commercial laundry service provider in the Bay Area for 47 years. When Royal began to encounter challenges with their previous chemical supplier, Royal's president Don Luckenbach, decided to look for alternatives. Don toured major plants across the US to look for formulas that would meet his quality and performance criteria and asked for proposals from the top contenders. When VASKA's CEO Julia Fry proposed tests using her green formulas, he was skeptical. After a highly successful 10-day test on their largest tunnel, he was ready to give the go ahead. Months later the changes at Royal are tangible to Luckenbach, 'Now when I walk into the plant in the morning I am greeted by the smell of lavender, and it makes me feel good that I am making a contribution to the health of our employees and the environment.' "

 

 

"Wareham Wins Permit for West Berkeley Bioscience Lab" by Riya Bhattacharjee, our Planet.

"In what was regarded as a first for West Berkeley's zoning history, the city's Zoning Adjustments Board last week gave Wareham Development the green light to exceed neighborhood height limits and construct a four-story, 92,000-square-foot bioscience lab on the Aquatic Park Campus."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/13/09

Our mayor, the Honorable Tom Bates et al, had a breakfast meeting at 900 GRAYSON this morning. You know, for an alter kocker he's a good lookin' guy--great presentation too, a wonderful royal-blue shirt.

 

 

"On the Dawn, at dawn" by George deVilbiss in the El Dorado Hills Telegraph.

"Berkeley is what, an hour and a half drive? When the alarm started going off at 3:15 a.m., the groans were obvious. But, when you want to fish for and hopefully catch halibut or striped bass, it means you've got to get to the bay waters early.

James Smith, skipper of the 50-foot California Dawn, said boarding time was about 5:30 with a 6 a.m. departure time. When I arrived at 5:20, there were already a handful of anxious anglers aboard.

Smith comes from a full line of fishermen. His dad, Jim Smith, skippers the well known Happy Hooker, also berthed at the Berkeley docks. His brother, Steve, runs a large fishing operation in Alaska."

 

 

"T6 chair made in Berkeley with British fabric" is a story about our Swerve by Tracey Taylor at sfgate.com.

Deborah Oropallo photo

"Call it the special relationship: When West Coast furniture-maker Michael Goldin incorporated a beautiful striped fabric by British fashion designer Paul Smith into his sleek T6 chair, the result was a marriage made in Anglo-American heaven. The chair is crafted at Swerve, Goldin's West Berkeley design manufactory, and its frame is precision-cut using durable, aircraft-grade aluminum.

'It's designed for permanence, not obsolescence,' says Goldin, adding that the materials are also recyclable.

The textile is Stripes by Paul Smith for Maharam. The sharp tailoring extends beyond the upholstery: The spring for the back of the chair can be tuned to the weight of its occupant. Next up from Swerve? A 'low-rider,' which, Goldin says, will be a 'reclining chaise version.'

The T6 chair is available from Swerve's showroom. Prices start at $750 depending on fabric.

2629 Seventh St., Berkeley; (877) 644-1898, www.swerveco.com. Paul Smith also recently opened a San Francisco store at 50 Geary St., San Francisco; (415) 352-2604."

 

 


"Tarnished Jewel" is a story at insidehighered.com. "There's blood in the water, and Vicki Ruiz knows everyone can smell it.

'The privates have come calling,' says Ruiz, dean of the University of California at Irvine's School of Humanities. 'I've lost very valued faculty members to Yale, to Northwestern, to Penn, to Pomona, to Scripps, as well as to even. . . . ' Ruiz trails off, then gives a few more names, sounding a bit surprised to mention them: Lehigh University and Fordham University. Fine institutions to be sure, but not the sort Ruiz expects to lose to in a bidding war.

'We are not able to put together the counter offers that we have in the past,' she says soberly.

These are far from the heady days of 2007, when Ruiz was named dean of Irvine's buzz-attracting School of Humanities. In that year, she hired 17 new professors. This year she hired four, even though nine searches had been planned. Ruiz has no illusions about returning to 2007 levels any time soon.

'We're going to be a smaller school,' she says. 'I think that's certainly in the near future.'

The budget crisis facing the University of California, a 10-campus system serving 225,000 students, is without precedent. According to the latest projections ­ and these numbers change all the time ­ the system can expect last year's $3.61 billion state budget to be reduced by about $813 million or approximately 20 percent. "

 

 

"The roots of inequity" by Jillian Sheridan is at dailytexanonline.com.

"When it comes to academia, women still have to choose between family and career. Last week, The Chronicle of Higher Education reported that academia is one of the less friendly professions for women with children.

In a 2006-7 study of 8,400 graduate students on nine University of California campuses, only 29 percent of women and 46 percent of men said that research universities were family-friendly places for tenure-track professors to work.

Even compared to other work-intensive, competitive professions, academia is not family friendly. A study produced by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Utah reported academic women are 27 percent less likely than doctors and 17 percent less likely than lawyers to have babies."

 

 

 

 

"Ask About the Preservation of Coney Island" at The New York Times.

"This week, Charles Denson, a Coney Island native and historian, will be answering readers' questions about the preservation of this historic area.

Readers who would like to submit a question for Mr. Denson should do so in the comments box below. The first set of responses will be posted on Wednesday.

Mr. Denson is the author of 'Coney Island: Lost and Found,' named 2002 New York Book of the Year by the New York Society Library. A writer, photographer and art director, he began his career in 1971 as a photographer for New York magazine and has since worked as art director for numerous publications. In 1999 he was awarded a Chronicle journalism fellowship at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. "

 

 

 

 

"Navitas Capital Attracts Green Building and Investing Leaders" is a press release at prweb.com.

"Newly formed board of advisors helps venture capital firm lead in investing in sustainable building materials and technologies.

Navitas Capital, an early-stage venture capital firm investing in green technology solutions for the built environment, announced today the creation of a nine-member Advisory Board composed of leading experts in materials science, building engineering, green design practices, real estate development and private equity and venture capital. The board will help guide Navitas' investments and strategic growth."

 

"Electric cars could dominate U.S. roads in 2030" is a report at reuters.com.

"Electric car sales could jump to 86 percent of U.S. light vehicle sales in 2030 if consumers don't have to buy batteries themselves, according to a University of California, Berkeley study to be released on Monday."

 

 

 

"Federal judge to weigh constitutionality of animal rights anti-terrorism law" by Howard Mintz at mercurynews.com.

"A federal judge in San Jose will weigh arguments today over whether a 2006 law designed to stem violent animal rights protests is unconstitutional, marking the nation's first legal showdown involving a Justice Department crackdown on activists accused of threats against medical researchers and others."


 

"California Tenants Have No Friends in Governor's Race' opines Paul Hogarth at beyondchron.org.

"Last Friday at 5:00 p.m. (which he's apt to do when releasing bad news), San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom vetoed three pro-tenant ordinances designed to help renters facing hard times. He even nixed a relatively mild proposal to limit 'banked' rent increases to 8% ­ despite this being consistent with existing policies at the Mayor's Office of Housing. Newsom's record on tenant issues in San Francisco has always been bad, and his latest act does not bode well for next year's statewide elections. California's 14 million renters need a champion in the Governor's Mansion after six years of a hostile Republican Administration, but Newsom currently only has one opponent for the Democratic primary ­ California Attorney General Jerry Brown. Based on his record as Mayor of Oakland."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/14/09

posts from the past

7/06

The patio furniture was stolen from 900 GRAYSON over the weekend. Security measures are being taken now to protect the patio.

 

Our Sarah illustrates books that her sister Kate writes.

She emails

Our new book is reviewed in PEOPLE magazine this week--complete with
book jacket. It is called "Regarding the Bathrooms" and is due out Aug 1st. . . . The book is for the 9-12 year old set.

Check out "Regarding the Bathrooms: A Privy to the Past."

 

Their current book is

Check it out

 

Cody's has--will-have--these books. And maybe you can find a used copy of "Why Do You Cry?" at Moe's.

 

Think Lebanon is just a TV event? A west-Berkeley friend's Mom and Dad just got out via Syria. They're home safe now.

 

I'm told that last week NEXUS lost the suit with the Humane Society--the jury ruling that the Society could evict NEXUS. Is the legal battle over?

 

Escrow has closed on the welding yard--the price paid by Acme Bread was just under 1.4 million dollars.

 

 

 

 

 

Today is Bastille Day in France

 

 

 

 

Claudia emails

Cameron and I just had a great lunch at [the restaurant at the west Berkeley Bowl,] Cafe W-they even served a generous serving of "homemade" chips, which were wonderful, light, not oily and not salty.

Have you checked out their menu yet?

Cafe W is opened until 7 pm, and starting next week will open at 7 am. They serve Peets coffee too and wine, yes wine. Perfect place for a healthy early dinner.

Ck

 

 

our Angela forwards an email

  Berkeley Police Department, National Night Out (NNO) is approaching!

It's Time to Celebrate Community During National Night Out 2009 !

The City of Berkeley community is participating in the 26th annual National Night Out on Tuesday, August 4, 2009.  What had started many years ago as a unique crime and drug prevention event has evolved in the City of Berkeley into a celebration of community.
Last year's National Night Out involved community members, law enforcement, fire personnel, community groups, businesses, neighborhood organizations and local officials from over 15,000 communities from all 50 states, U.S. territories and Canada. In all, over 37 million people participated in National Night Out 2008.
We are encouraging community members to participate. You need not be an organized group to join in the celebration. In the past, groups have hosted BBQ's, pot lucks, picnics, ice cream/dessert socials, kids parades, neighborhood clean-ups and music performances. Members of a diversity of City of Berkeley departments visit celebrations throughout the city that night.

To be part of National Night Out in Berkeley, please complete a National Night Out Registration Form and fax to 510-981-5819.
or mail to : Berkeley Police Department
                 Community Services Bureau
              Sgt. Mary Kusmiss S-6
                 2100 Martin Luther King Jr. Way
                 Berkeley, CA. 94704-1109    

 

 

    

 

" Pacific Steel Lays Off Half its Workforce, Citing Weak Economy" writes Riya Bhattacharjee of our Planet.

"West Berkeley's Pacific Steel Casting, the nation's fourth largest surviving steel foundry, is hurting badly.

Company spokesperson Elizabeth Jewel told the Daily Planet Friday that a weak economy was playing havoc with its sales, forcing the steel plant to cut half its workforce.

The foundry, which has been operating at Second and Gilman streets for 75 years, laid off a couple of hundred workers in the last seven months, including 40 in June, and announced that another 75 new layoffs are on the way, sometime after Aug. 31. Pacific Steel had about 600 workers on its payroll until earlier this year; the cuts will leave the company with just 300.

Management positions have also been eliminated, she said.

The company, founded in 1934, is suffering low sales in part because one of its biggest customers, the Peterbilt Motors Company, has drastically reduced orders."

 

 

 


"The sun rises in the West:Berkeley, Calif:program is helping some homeowners warm up to solar power by offering city-backed loans, a model that's raising eyebrows around the country"
by E.B. Solomont at mnn.com.

"The city of Berkeley, Calif., is nothing if not progressive. It's the kind of place where you'd expect to see solar panels on rooftops and now, thanks to a new loan program for homeowners, you'll probably see even more.

Starting last fall, Berkeley began offering city-backed loans to homeowners looking to install solar panels. Through the Berkeley FIRST program, the loans were offered to a pilot group of 40 homeowners as a way of mitigating the biggest obstacle to solar: cost.

'We were trying to brainstorm and think about how we could promote solar installation, and we kept coming back to the biggest problem - financing it,' says Berkeley's mayor, Tom Bates. 'We think this idea will enable our citizens to go more solar than they currently are.' "

 

 

 

"Solar foothold reaches beyond Santa Cruz to more conservative regions" by Kurtis Alexander at mercurynews.com. "Solar panels have long been the domain of eco-conscious communities like Santa Cruz and Berkeley. Not anymore.

A new report on solar energy suggests California's more traditional, inland regions have jumped on the bandwagon and in some cases out-greened their coastal counterparts.

'The face of solar power is changing,"'said Bernadette Del Chiaro, clean energy advocate with Environment California, the nonprofit research group that authored the report. 'We're seeing more than the usual adoptees like the Santa Cruz and the coastal areas. We're seeing Bakersfield and Fresno, typically conservative cities, embracing solar power.' "

 

 

 

"Three Berkeley Lab scientists win PECASE award" is a report at nanowerk.com.

"Three scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) were among the 100 researchers named by President Barack Obama to receive the prestigious Presidential Early Career for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) Award, the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on early-career researchers.

The Berkeley Lab recipients were: Cecilia Aragon, a staff scientist with Berkeley Lab's Computational Research Division; Jeff Neaton, director of the Theory of Nanostructured Materials Facility with the Molecular Foundry, a DOE nanoscience research center at Berkeley Lab; and Sanjay Kumar, a bioengineer who holds joint appointments with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division and the University of California at Berkeley. They will receive their awards in the fall at a White House ceremony."

 

 

 

 

"Survey Finds One in Six Consumers Act on Spam" Jeremy Kirk, IDG News Service at pcworld.com.

"About one in six consumers have at some time acted on a spam message, affirming the economic incentive for spammers to keep churning out millions of obnoxious pitches per day, according to a new survey."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

from my log

6/28/09--8:49 AM--irritant in warehouse front and SERIOUS irritant IMMEDIATELY in front of warehouse, nausea, light head. Off-and-on all day, irritant in warehouse front.

7/3/09--5:15 PM--irritant IMMEDIATELY in front of warehouse.

7/6/09--6:54 AM--SERIOUS irritant in IMMEDIATELY front of warehouse, cough, light head.

7/7/09--Off-and-on all morning SERIOUS irritant in front room, light head, dry skin, wear mask, over-rides two HEPA filters.

7/8/09--6:22 AM--SERIOUS irrtant in front room, light head, eyes smart, over-rides two HEPA filters.

7/10/09--3:21 PM--irritant in front room.

7/13/09--6:02 AM--SERIOUS irritant in front room, wear mask. 11:29 AM irritant IMMEDIATELY in front of warehouse and in front room, wear mask.

 

post from the past

7/12/01--~8:45 AM--dizzy with burning eyes and mouth.

7/14/09--8:31 AM--VERY SERIOUS irritant in front room, headache, light head, burning eyes, wear mask, overrides 2 HEPA filters. 8:49 AM, leave.

 

 

Eternally useful links

 

Bay Area home prices from sfgate.com

 

Bay Area foreclosures from sfgate.com


Our City Council update is here.

 

Our Planning Commision update is here

 

 

You can find more information about our current weather conditions than is good for you at www.wunderground.com

Want to see weather coming in, going out, beautiful sunsets, and much, much more? Check out http://sv.berkeley.edu/view/ This very hip site was in an email from reader and contributor, Tony Almeida. Read Tony's Jimi Hendrix story on the only page that routinely gets more hits than Scrambled Eggs.

 

Best gas prices in 94710, as well as all of US and Canada, are here at gasbuddy.com

Kimar finds Costco routinely has the lowest price.

 

Richmond Ramblers' motorcycle club member, Cliff Miller emails a very

useful link

If you ever need to get a human being on the phone at a credit card company or bank, etc., this site tells you how to defeat their automated system and get you to a human being within a few seconds.

http://gethuman.com/

 

Markets is not just a reference for Berkeley-Hills radicals with 1.5 mil homes and considerable portfolios.

 

Our City of Berkeley Boards and Commissions page is here--redone and friendly.

 

 

Berkeley Police reports at insidebay area.com are here.

 

Our Berkeley PD Site with crime statistics and more is here.


Crime Log for 94710 is here

This site is NOT affiliated with Berkeley PD.
Take time to report crime!

 

All reports of crime-in-progress should first go to Berkeley PD dispatch--911 or non-emergency, 981-5900. THEN make sure you notify EACH of these City people.

The contacts are below:

Our new Area Coordinator is Officer Karen Buckheit, Berkeley PD - 981-5774 kbuckheit@ci.berkeley.ca.us

Angela Gallegos-Castillo, City Mgr Off - 981-2491 agallegos-castillo@ci.berkeley.ca.us

Ryan Lau, aid to Darryl Moore - 981-7120 rlau@ci.berkeley.ca.us

Darryl Moore, City Councilman dmoore@ci.berkeley.ca.us

 

More Scrambled Eggs & Lox, here

and

Stories about Berkeley and stories about recorded-music

are at

Journal of Recorded Music 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

 

ronpenndorf@earthlink.net

The original owner of all posted material retains copyright. The material is used only to illustrate.